GE FXHTC Radial Flow Carbon Filter Video Transcript

Hey everyone, Aquaman here with FilterDoctor.com. Today we’re looking at the GE FXHTC. This is an industry standard size cartridge, approximately 10 inches long by 4 ½ inches in diameter, which means it’s going to fit into a vast selection of industry standard size filter housings, like for example, the popular HD-950 that you see here.

Now, the FXHTC is a radial flow carbon filter. Now radial flow tells us that the water is entering the entire outer surface area of the filter; then going to the center and rising to the top and exiting the cartridge. This is very different from the typical design of axial flow granular activated carbon filters. And, this design, the radial flow design, provides for much greater flow with less pressure loss. If you put a typical axial flow granular activated carbon filter in a whole house filter like this you will probably experience a really high pressure loss that you’ll find unsatisfying. Particularly when multiple applications are demanding water and they want that water flow, and it’s just not available, because that type of cartridge will restrict the flow. You won’t have that problem with the FXHTC.

Now, this filter is NSF Standard 42 certified for a number of contaminants; and of course, carbon removes a long list of organic and inorganic contaminants. And then the layer of polypropylene on the outside here will capture sediment up to 25 microns, while the carbon layer in between, will remove chlorine taste and odor and a variety of those contaminants I already mentioned. Filter life is approximately 30,000 gallons, but that again depends on your unique circumstances. If you have a heavy load of sediment you could potentially clog the filter on the exterior surface before the carbon is truly exhausted.

So, depending on your circumstances, it may be necessary to have two filter housings in series, one with a sediment filter then followed by this carbon filter. The sediment filter will obviously protect the carbon filter and allow it to do its’ job for the full 30,000 gallons. Again, this is the GE FXHTC, and I’m your host Aquaman with FilterDoctor.com. Thanks for watching. 

See detailed specifications and purchase the GE FXHTC here.